Sermon on the Mount – 16 – Treasure

Two questions every Christian should ask himself or herself are the following:  “Where is my heart,” and “Where is my treasure?”  In His sermon the mount, Jesus makes the connection that our heart and our treasure are always in agreement.  In Matthew 6:21, He says, “For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.”  Jesus has always been more concerned with our heart versus our actions.  Out of our mouths come that which fill the heart (Matthew 12:34).  The religious leaders in Jesus’ day were more focused on their conduct when Jesus is more concerned with our character.  Our conduct flows out of our character.  Jesus calls us to store up for ourselves treasures in heaven where moth and rust do no destroy and where thieves cannot break in and steal versus storing up for ourselves treasures on earth where moth and rust do destroy and where thieves do break in and steal. What kind of investments are you making?  Are you seeking first the King and His Kingdom or are you seeking first your kingdom and investing in earth?

This message is from Konnor Kessler at our Atoka Campus. If you missed a message or what to hear it again, listen on-line or tune in to our podcast.

This message was recorded on September 22, 2019 at Gateway’s Atoka Campus


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Sermon on the Mount – 14 – How Do I Approach God?

In Jesus greatest sermon, He took time to talk about one of the most important spiritual disciplines for His followers. Prayer was a huge part of Jesus’ life and should characterize every follower of Christ. 

Wouldn’t it be great if prayer just came easily and naturally to us?  Unfortunately, most of the time it doesn’t. In fact, prayer is commonly described as an area of struggle for most believers. It’s a discipline. It’s something that we work at and develop over the course of our walk with Jesus. 

In Matthew 6:5-15, Jesus tells us how NOT to pray, and then gives us a model prayer to follow as we pray. In this beautiful prayer, we learn that how we approach God is important. We come to Him as a loving Father that deeply cares about every aspect of our lives. We come to Him as an all-powerful God that wants to rule and reign in every area of our lives. We come to Him as a holy God that is worthy of reverence and awe. 

Jesus was kind to give us a model prayer. May we approach our Heavenly Father with the same heart that Jesus taught us!


This message is from Steve Carpenter at our Atoka Campus.  If you missed a message or want to hear it again, listen on-line or tune in to our podcast.

This message was recorded on September 8, 2019


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Sermon on the Mount – 13 – Beware of Hypocrisy

Warnings are good things. 

As Hurricane Dorian bears down on the East Coast, hurricane warnings have been posted so that people will prepare and be ready for the possibility of a destructive storm. If people listen to the warning, they can be spared from the full effect of the storm. If they do not, then they risk losing their lives and possessions. 

In the next section of the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus gives us a warning for an even more destructive storm in our lives. Essentially, it is a warning against hypocrisy. As He teaches about giving to the poor, Jesus warns His listeners to be careful of their motives when doing good things. Far too often, we do good things for the wrong reasons. This is the epitome of hypocrisy. Jesus warns in Matthew 6:1-4, that when we do things for the applause of men instead of for the glory of God, there is a storm of regret that awaits. 

Warnings are good things…if we heed them.


This message is from Steve Carpenter at our Atoka Campus.  If you missed a message or want to hear it again, listen on-line or tune in to our podcast.

This message was recorded on September 1, 2019.


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Sermon on the Mount – 12 – Forgive Your Enemies

In case you haven’t noticed, Jesus said a lot of difficult things in the Sermon on the Mount!  In fact, most of His teaching was counter-cultural and would have made his listeners very uncomfortable.  Jesus’ teaching went straight to the heart and are difficult for us to hear and obey as well.  Perhaps one of the most difficult teachings in the entire sermon is where Jesus says, “Love your enemies, bless those who curse you, do good to those who hate you, and pray for those who spitefully use you and persecute you.”  The religious leaders of Jesus’ day taught that you only had to love those that loved you.  Jesus was clearly calling them, and us, to a much deeper kind of love…even to those that do not love us.

How do we do this?  It seems almost impossible.  It is impossible in our own power.  Jesus is clearly the only one that has ever loved his enemies so deeply that He would forgive the very ones that took His life.  Romans 5:8 says that He loved us “while we were still sinners” and enemies of God.  So, He is both our example and our strength when it comes to loving those that despise us.  As we look to Christ alone, we will find the grace to love our enemies and to do good to those that hate us.

This message is from Steve Carpenter at our Atoka Campus.  If you missed a message or want to hear it again, listen on-line or tune in to our podcast.


This message was recorded on August 25 at Gateway’s Atoka Campus


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