Sermon on the Mount – 2 – The Salt of the Earth

Jesus clearly says in Matthew chapter 5 that believers are to be the “salt of the earth.” Salt has always been valuable in human society, especially in the days of Jesus. The Romans believed that, except for the sun, nothing was more valuable than salt. Often Roman soldiers were paid in salt, and it was from that practice that the expression “not worth his salt” originated. In some societies, salt was a mark of friendship. If two persons shared salt, it indicated mutual responsibility to look after each other’s welfare and safety. You were obligated to treat them as a friend. It was also used to bind covenants and to make agreements. There is no doubt that those who heard Jesus’ words would have understood the value of salt.

So, when Jesus says to his followers that they are “salt” it certainly meant that they had a huge role in influencing the world in valuable ways. Salt adds flavor it preserves good. Salt creates thirst and it stings when it reveals a wound. All of these are analogies of the influence that followers of Jesus can have on the world today. Jesus certainly wanted HIs followers to know that they had very important role int he world around them. What about you/ Are you using your life, hour saltiness, to influence the people around you? Have you allowed the saltiness of your life a s Christian to lose its flavor and impact? May God teach us today to seize the opportunity to make a difference in our world!


This message is from Steve Carpenter at our Atoka Campus.  If you missed the message or want to hear it again, listen on-line or tune in to our podcast.


This message was recorded on June 9, 2019


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Sermon on the Mount – Intro

The book of Matthew contains three chapters that make up the most comprehensive recording of Jesus’ teachings. The “Sermon on the Mount” was delivered in one continuous message at one particular time to Jesus’ followers and the multitudes. It has been memorized, quoted and misquoted, understood and misunderstood by generations of believers. What is clear is that its importance has never changed.

It shows the importance of the new birth we receive in Christ. The standards of this sermon are too high to meet on our won. In fact, the standards listed in the Sermon on the Mount are even greater than those in the law. In turn, it drives the listener to Jesus as man’s only hope before God. The sermon reveals the standards, objectives, and motivations that help to fulfill God’s design in us and helps us find peace and hope. It is, in addition, an incredible resource for witnessing and reaching others for Christ. A person that seeks to live out the Sermon on the Mount will draw others to Him. Finally, this sermon was designed by Jesus to confront us with our sinfulness and help us see our great need for Christ.

As Jesus spoke these words in Matthew 5-7, no doubt there were those that were angry. There were others that felt as if Jesus was pointing directly at them. Certainly others found peace and joy in His words. I’m sure that some walked away and lived out the words of Jesus, while others simply walked away and continued as before. Over the next few weeks, we may be angry or convicted over the words of Jesus. As we study, we may clearly hear the voice of the Lord calling for change in our hearts and lives. We will also find peace and joy and challenge as we study the inspired words of these chapters.

My prayer is that we will not walk away unchanged, but that we will be forever different as a result of applying the truths in the Sermon on the Mount. I pray that we will see the grace of God in our failures, and that we will accept the challenge to live with holiness and find the peace and joy that obedience can bring.


This message is from Steve Carpenter at our Atoka Campus.  If you missed the message or want to hear it again, listen on-line or tune in to our podcast.


This message was recorded on June 2, 2019


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How To Destroy Your Home – Part 2

How to Destroy Your Home”. It’s pretty simple – just hold on to bitterness and unforgiveness. And since none of us is perfect – we all need to learn to show grace and forgiveness in our families. The Bible has a lot to say about this.


This message is from Steve Carpenter at our Atoka Campus.  If you missed the message or want to hear it again, listen on-line or tune in to our podcast.



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Gather in Munford

This is the start of our G4 series at Gateway Munford.  G4 stands for Gather, Grow, Give, and Go.  What should the church do when it gathers together?  What are the important marks of gathering?  Is it simply going to church, singing songs, listening to a sermon, or saying “amen”?  Not exactly.  According to Scripture…worship is what marks the gathering together of believers.  We are going to look at what the Bible says about worship and how it is less about being in a certain place and doing external religious things and more about an internal response of the heart that leads to an outward expression of God’s worth.


This message is from Jason Rodgers at our Munford Campus. If you missed a message or want to listen again, listen on-line or tune in to our podcast.



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